Eurovision 2021 Results – Statistical Analysis

Another Eurovision season is sadly behind us, as the grand final of Eurovision 2021 was held yesterday. Italy is the winner of Eurovision 2021!

In this article, I will try to dive as deep as possible into Eurovision 2021 results.

Part 1 – Grand Final Results

Final results (jury vote and public vote combined)

Jury Results

Public Vote

The WinnerMåneskin

1. Italy won Eurovision 2021, after being 4th in jury vote and winning the public vote. Since the new method of voting was decided, it is the first time the winner didn’t end up in the top 3 on the jury vote.

2. Italy receives public votes from every single country! The lowest result was the Dutch public vote with only 2 points.

3. 28 different jury panels ranked Italy in their top 10 list. 10 jury panels didn’t put them on the top 10 list and those are  Israel, Malta, Azerbaijan, the Netherlands, France, DenmarkIreland, Moldova, the United Kingdom, and Spain.

4. This is the 3rd Italian victory in the contest, after 1964 and 1990.

5. The last time a band won Eurovision was in 2006 Lordi from Finland and finally it happened again this year. Moreover, it was the last time when the winning song was a rock song until now.

6. Italy ended up in the top6 for the 4th year in a row!

7. For the first time, asrtist that was born after 2000, won Eurovision (part of Måneskin members were born in the 2000-2001).

Jury Voting vs Public Voting

1. The countries that got the highest damage by the jury voting are (points wisely):


Ukraine – a difference of 170 points (97 – jury, 267 – public vote) which are 46% of its points.
Finland – a difference of 135 points (83 – jury, 218 – public vote) which are 44% of its points.
Italy – a difference of 112 points (206- jury, 318 – public vote) which are 21% of its points.
Lithuania – a difference of 110 points (55 – jury, 165 – public vote) which are 50% of its points.

2. The countries that got the highest damage by the public voting are (points wisely):


Malta – a difference of 161 points (208 – jury, 47 – public vote) which are 63% of its points.
Bulgaria – a difference of 110 points (140 – jury, 30 – public vote) which are 65% of its points.
Switzerland – a difference of 102 points (267 – jury, 165 – public vote) which are 23% of its points.
Portugal – a difference of 99 points (126 – jury, 27 – public vote) which are 64% of its points.
Belgium – a difference of 68 points (71 – jury, 3 – public vote) which are 64% of its points.

Countries Doing History

  1. This is the first time since its debut that San Marino has received 12 points from another country – it was Poland who gave them the first set of 12 points.
  2. Since the introduction of the semi-finals (2004), this is the first time that Belgium and Switzerland qualified for the grand final together, the same thing for Bulgaria and Switzerland and for Iceland and Bulgaria.
  3. This is the first time Australia doesn’t make it to the grand final.
  4. 6 pre-qualifiers were split in an interesting way this year: 2 of them ended in the top 2 (Italy and France), while the 4 others ended up in the bottom 4 (The Netherlands, Spain, Germany, and the United Kingdom).
  5. Ukraine remains the only country that always qualifies for the final, as Australia didn’t qualify for the first time.
  6. After being 6 years in a row in the top 10, Sweden found itself out of the top10, again in 14th place as in 2013.
  7. Ukraine achieves another top5 result for the first time since their last win in 2016.
  8. Malta has achieved their second-best place since 2005 (2nd place) and in 2021 ended up in 7th place.
  9. Portugal has achieved their second-best place in the modern era (since 2000) except for their win in 2017.
  10. It’s the second year in a row that the United Kingdom has ended up in last place in the grand final.
  11. For the first time since 1965 (with a different voting method), 4 countries received 0 points (2021 – in the public vote, 1965 – in the whole vote). In 2021, those countries were: The Netherlands, Spain, Germany, and the United Kingdom.
  12. France finally ends up at the top5 for the first time since 2002 (then France was 4th).
  13. Among the countries that participated in 2021, Spain is the only country that ended up always out of the top 20 since 2015.
  14. The top 6 list is a unique list: Italy, France, Switzerland, Iceland, Ukraine, and Finland – it includes 4 bands, 4 songs in a foreign language, 2 French ballads.
  15. Germany receives 0 points from the public, the second year in a row (and it happened in 2015 as well).
  16. Switzerland ends second in a row in the top5, after 4 years on non-qualifying (2015-2018). The last time they ended up in 3rd place was in 1993 (and in 2021 of course!).
  17. Although Malta was one of the favorites to win, Destiny ended up in 7th place overall (and was only 14th in the public vote).
  18. Iceland ends up in the top10 in the second year in a row, after 4 years on non-qualifying (2015-2018).
  19. Albania qualified for the final for the 3rd time in a row, after sending a song in the Albanian language for each one of these 3 years.
  20. Israel and Cyprus celebrate 6 consecutive years in the grand final (2015-2019, 2021).
  21. Greece returns to the top 10 list, for the first time since 2013!
  22. Lithuania has achieved its second-best place, except for being in 6th place in 2006.
  23. Sweden qualifies for the grand final for the 10th time in a row!
  24. In 1958, The Netherlands hosted the contest and the same countries ended in the top3 (nut in another order): France, Switzerland, Italy

Part 2 – Semi-Final 1

Here are the full results for semi-final 1:

  1. The top 10 countries by the jury were: Malta, Russia, Ukraine, Israel, Cyprus, Sweden, Belgium, Lithuania, Romania, and Croatia. The last 2 didn’t qualify for the final.
  2. The top countries by the public were: Ukraine, Malta, Lithuania, Russia, Israel, Azerbaijan, Cyprus, Norway, Croatia, and Sweden. One of them (Croatia) didn’t qualify.
  3. Even though Croatia was in the top 10 of both jury votes and a public vote, the country didn’t make it to the final, following a difference of points that other countries had between jury and public. Croatia missed the final by only 6 points.
  4. Belgium was saved by the jury and made it to the final.
  5. Norway and Azerbaijan were saved by the public and made it to the final.
  6. Ukraine wins public vote in semi-final 1, as Malta wins jury vote in semi-final 1.
  7. Romania stays out of the grand final for the 3rd time in a row.
  8. All ex-Yugoslavian countries that participated in that semi-final didn’t qualify: Slovenia, Croatia, and North Macedonia.
  9. Ukraine received televoting points from each country that voted in semi-final 1 (the lowest score was 4 points from Malta).
  10. The jury panel from Italy and Cyprus were the only ones that didn’t give points to Ukraine.
  11. Malta received jury points from each country that voted in semi-final 1 (the lowest score was 5 points from Ukraine).
  12. Malta received televoting points from each country that voted in semi-final 1 (the lowest score was 5 points from Slovenia).
  13. In semi-final 1, Israel ended up above Cyprus, Cyprus ended up above Sweden. In the grand final, it was the other way around: Sweden ended up above Cyprus, Cyprus ended up above Israel.
  14. Australia was last in the public vote, North Macedonia was last in the jury vote. However, Ireland ended up last in the combined vote. This is the second time in a row that Ireland is last in the semi-final.

Part 3 – Semi-Final 2

Here are the full results for semi-final 2:

  1. The top 10 countries by the jury were in the same top 10 as in the combined vote (but in another order): Switzerland, Bulgaria, Iceland, Portugal, Greece, Finland, San Marino, Albania, Moldova, and Serbia.
  2. The top 10 countries by the public were: Finland, Iceland, Switzerland, Moldova, Portugal, Bulgaria, Greece, Denmark, Serbia, and San Marino. Denmark is the only one among them that didn’t qualify.
  3. Albania was saved by the jury and qualified for the final.
  4. Latvia and Georgia didn’t qualify for the final for the 4th year in a row.
  5. San Marino qualified for the final for the 2nd year in a row and for the 3rd time ever.
  6. Poland didn’t qualify for the final for the 3rd year in a row.
  7. It’s the first time Switzerland has won a semi-final!
  8. Switzerland is the winner of the second semi-final (and in the combined vote) but ended in 3rd place in the public vote. Finland wins the public vote.
  9. 2 jury panels haven’t put Switzerland in their top 10 list: Greece and Bulgaria..
  10. Switzerland received points from each voting country in the public vote (the lowest score was 3 points from the United Kingdom and Georgia).
  11. Finland receives points from each voting country in the public vote (the lowest score was 2 points fron France).
  12. Georgia was last in the jury vote, the Czech Republic was last in the public vote (with 0 points), but Latvia ended in last place in the combined result.
  13. Denmark missed the final by 24 points

Part 4 – Jury Members You May Know

As always, some jury members are Eurovision related and here they are:

  • Aurel Thellimi (Albania) – participated in the national selection several times (the last time was in 2019).
  • Kejsi Tola (Albania) – represented the country at Eurovision 2009.
  • PAENDA (Austria) – represented the country at Eurovision 2019.
  • Elis Mraz (Czech Republic) – participated in the national selection in 2020.
  • Lise Cabble (Denmark) – well-known writer of Eurovision songs, including Denmark‘s winning song in 2013
  • Birgit Sarrap (Estonia) – represented the country at Eurovision 2013.
  • Dave Benton (Estonia) – represented the country at Eurovision 2001 as part of a duo who won back then.
  • Elina Born (Estonia) – represented the country at Eurovision 2015 as part of a duo.
  • Stig Rästa (Estonia) – represented the country at Eurovision 2015 as part of a duo.
  • Sopho Toroshelidze (Georgia) – the lead singer of the band Eldrine that represented the country in 2011.
  • Matti Matt (Iceland) – part of the band that represented the country in 2011.
  • Nelly Ciobanu (Moldova) – represented the country in 2009.
  • CLEO (Poland) – represented the country in 2014.
  • Marta Carvalho (Portugal) – the composer and songwriter of the intended song of the country for Eurovision 2020Medo De Sentir“.
  • Dora (Portugal) – represented the country at Eurovision 1988.
  • Milan Stanković (Serbia) – represented the country in 2010.
  • Tijana (Serbia) represented the country in 2017.
  • Chiara Dubey (Switzerland) – participated in the national final in 2018.
  • Jack Vidgen (Australia) – participated in the national final in 2020.
  • Kate Ryan (Belgium) represented the country in 2006.
  • Luka Nižetić (Croatia) – participated in the national final in 2019.
  • Ivy Quainoo (Germany) – participated in the national final in 2018.
  • Ira Losco (Malta) – represented the country in 2002 + 2016.
  • Michela (Malta) – represented the country in 2019.
  • Jana Burceska (North Macedonia) – represented the country in 2017.
  • Dina Garipova (Russia) – represented the country in 2013.
  • Amaya (Slovenia) – represented the country in 2011.
  • Nuša Derenda (Slovenia) – represented the country in 2001.
  • Raay (Slovenia) – represented the country at Eurovision 2015 as part of a duo.
  • Nanne Grönvall (Sweden) – represented the country at Eurovision1996 as part of a group.
  • Omar Rudberg (Sweden) – participated in the national selection in 2019
  • Ilinca (Romania) – represented the country at Eurovision 2017 as part of a duo.
  • Luminita Anghel (Romania) – represented the country at Eurovision 2005.


You can find all the relevant information on our Eurovision 2021 homepage:

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Eurovision-2021-Homepage.jpg

I live in Israel and watch Eurovision since the early 2000s. I work as a mathematician but have a big interest in singing, music, and writing

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